Sleepy Hollow's Phelps Adds New Breast Cancer Technology

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SLEEPY HOLLOW, N.Y. -- GE Healthcare has announced that Phelps Memorial Hospital Center is one of the first hospitals in the nation to install a new breast technology, the Invenia Automated Breast Sound System, for a more accurate diagnosis of breast cancer. 

GE Healthcare unveiled the first Invenia ABUS installations at Phelps Memorial Hospital Center in Sleepy Hollow and Fairfax Radiological Consultants outside Washington, D.C.

The new technology enables health care providers to offer women with dense breast tissue an efficient, comfortable and nonionizing screening solution.

"Phelps Memorial Hospital Center prides itself on keeping up with cutting-edge technologies, and we are very excited to integrate ABUS into our mammography program," said Michael Glennon, senior administrative director of ancillary services at Phelps. "This highly sophisticated system is more efficient than the traditional ultrasound exam and will significantly enhance our diagnostic capabilities and potentially improve outcomes for our patients."

The Invenia ABUS enhances the patient experience by using 3-D ultrasound technology to comfortably and quickly image women with dense breast tissue in about 15 minutes with new features that conform to a woman's body and provide more enhanced images.

GE Healthcare has designed the Invenia ABUS with the patented Reverse Curve transducer to conform to a woman's anatomy for better comfort and image performance. Further, the system uses Compression Assist, a feature that applies light levels of compression automatically to the breast for increased ease and image reproducibility.

GE plans to roll out the Invenia ABUS nationwide in 2014 with health providers across the country.

"We are excited about launching our most innovative and intuitive ABUS system yet, the Invenia ABUS, and are proud to make our first installs at the renowned facilities at Phelps Memorial and Fairfax Radiological Consultants," said Anders Wold, president and CEO of GE's ultrasound business. 

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