Irvington Board Of Education Fields Committee Hosts Public Meetings

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The Irvington School District continues its meetings on plans to renovate district athletic field on March 13 and March 20.
The Irvington School District continues its meetings on plans to renovate district athletic field on March 13 and March 20. Photo Credit: Daily Voice

IRVINGTON, N.Y. -- The Irvington Schools Board of Education Fields Project Committee released a report at its most recent meeting on the potential upgrades of district athletic fields and will host two more meetings in March.

The Fields Project Committee, which was established in February 2014 by the Board of Education to examine potential upgrades to several fields, presented its findings and recommendations to the Board of Education on Monday, March 10.

The next steps in the process include open community input sessions scheduled for Thursday, March 13 and March 20.

At the March 13 meeting, members of the Board’s facilities committee will also make a present regarding district-wide building infrastructure.

The Fields Project Committee reached five basic conclusions, which take the form of responses to guiding questions, are articulated in the report.

They include:

• Preservation of East Field as natural grass.

• Establishment of an artificial surface at Meszaros Field, with use of an organic infill.

• A recommendation against the installation of lights at Meszaros Field, though support for the installation of electrical conduit during construction.

• Replacement of Oley Track within the existing footprint.

• A host of smaller recommendations for equipment and future maintenance.

The report included extensive investigation of field usage by students and community members, examination of resources in peer districts, review of artificial (turf) products, comparison of 10-year and 20-year maintenance costs of both artificial and natural grass fields, and other significant data points. 

The committee noted in its report, “…the district fields are interrelated and cannot be individually reviewed or analyzed without looking at them as a system.”

The committee chairs noted that the votes held for all recommendations made in the report reflected a ‘supermajority’ of the committee.

The report is available on the district’s website for review by members of the public.


 

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